Össur Introduces First Mind-Controlled Bionic Prosthetic Lower Limbs For Amputees

Source of the Article: ossur.com, go to the website to see the video on the technology of these new prosthetics.

Össur Technology Adapts To User’s Subconscious, Intuitive Actions

Two amputees are the first people in the world able to control their Bionic prosthetic legs with their thoughts, thanks to tiny implanted myoelectric sensors (IMES) that have been surgically placed in their residual muscle tissue. The IMES, which was provided by the Alfred Mann Foundation, instantaneously triggers the desired movement, via a receiver located inside the prosthesis. This process occurs subconsciously, continuously and in real-time.

The announcement was made today by Jon Sigurdsson, President & CEO of Össur, the global innovator credited with creating the world’s first Bionic prostheses for amputees.

“Mind-controlled Bionic prosthetic legs are a remarkable clinical breakthrough in next-generation Bionic technology,” Sigurdsson said, speaking at the company’s Capital Markets Day in Copenhagen. “By adapting not only to the individual’s intentional movements but to intuitive actions, we are closer than ever to creating prosthetics that are truly integrated with their user.”

How Mind-Controlled Bionic Prosthetics Work

Össur’s commercially available Bionic prostheses are smart limbs capable of real-time learning and automatically adjusting to their user’s walking style (gait), speed and terrain. Walking with a Bionic prosthesis, however, still typically requires some conscious, intentional thought from the user.

According to Dr. Thorvaldur Ingvarsson, M.D., Ph.D, the orthopaedic surgeon who leads Össur’s research and development efforts and spearheaded the mind-controlled prosthetics project, movement in able-bodied individuals generally begins subconsciously, which triggers electrical impulses inside the body that catalyze the appropriate muscles into action. Össur’s new technology replicates that process in an amputee: that electronic impulse from the brain is received by an IMES that was surgically placed by Dr. Ingvarsson into muscles in the amputee’s residual limb.

“The technology allows the user’s experience with their prosthesis to become more intuitive and integrative,” Dr. Ingvarsson said. “The result is the instantaneous physical movement of the prosthesis however the amputee intended. They no longer need to think about their movements because their unconscious reflexes are automatically converted into myoelectric impulses that control their Bionic prosthesis.”

Promising First-In-Man Results

According to Dr. Ingvarsson, the mind-controlled technology works with all current commercially available Össur Bionic prostheses, including the company’s POWER KNEE, RHEO KNEE, PROPRIO FOOT and SYMBIONIC LEG.

Two amputees have participated in the company’s initial First-in-Man research. Both were implanted with the IMES and have been living with Össur’s mind-controlled Bionic prostheses for more than one year. Dr. Ingvarsson notes that feedback from both users has been very positive, and that clinical trials to further assess the technology will continue.

“As a global leader in prosthetics and orthopaedics, we at Össur never stop innovating. We are resolute in our commitment to expand the boundaries of possibility, so that we may help even more people enjoy a life without limitations,” Sigurdsson concluded.

About Össur

Össur (NASDAQ: OSSR) is a global leader in non-invasive orthopaedics that help people live a life without limitations. Its business is focused on improving people’s mobility through the delivery of innovative technologies within the fields of Prosthetic, Osteoarthritis and Injury Solutions.

A recognized “Technology Pioneer,” Össur invests significantly in research and product development—its award-winning designs ensuring a consistently strong position in the market. Successful patient and clinical outcomes are further empowered via Össur’s educational programs and business solutions. Headquartered in Iceland, Össur has major operations in the Americas, Europe and Asia, with additional distributors worldwide. www.ossur.com

Logan students spend year building special prosthetic leg

A group of Logan High School students spent the entire year creating a prosthetic limb, which simultaneously charges while the person walks.

The InvenTeam talked with members in the industry, who told stories of patients not being able to enjoy long trips outdoors for fear of losing power.

Logan teacher Steve Johnston said the class provides a unique opportunity.

“I try to always emphasize with the kids that we want to give them a unique engineering experience,” Johnston said. “We also want to make sure the item can help people in everyday life.”

The project faced several obstacles that the students had to overcome, including starting from scratch.

“We can’t test this on a human subject,” Johnston said. “We had to spend more time creating a tester to simulate the heel strike and foot motion to harvest energy from it.”

A bluetooth device in the leg allows a user to view the power remaining on their cellphone. The battery is charged by a person’s heel striking the ground.

A pair of engineers were brought in during the year to help students with the project.

The group will now give a presentation on their invention at the EurekaFest at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), as well as tour the area.

Source of the Article: wizmnews.com

Project Circleg uses recycled plastic to build low-cost prosthetics in Kenya

Circleg recycled plastic prosthetic leg

Two Zurich-based graduates have created a low cost lower-limb prosthetic made of recycled plastic waste that is collected and processed in local factories in Kenya.      Project Circleg was founded by industrial design undergraduates Fabian Engel and Simon Oschwald at Zurich University of the Arts in March 2018 as a degree project.     The two designers wanted to find a way to help the millions of people in less developed countries who need a prosthesis because of traffic accidents, poor medical care or armed conflict.Circleg recycled plastic prosthetic leg

Most prosthetic limbs that are currently available tend to be lacking in functionality or are unaffordable to many who need them. Without access to them, many individuals are confined to their homes, are dependent on others for help and live fairly excluded lives.Circleg recycled plastic prosthetic leg

Alongside this need for prosthetic limbs, Oschwald and Engel wanted to address the issue of plastic pollution in less developed countries, where it is particularly high due to lack of recycling resources.                                                                                                             “As industrial designers, we see plastic waste as a valuable resource for meaningful products. So we came up with the idea to combine the topics of plastic pollution with the high demand for low-cost prosthetics in developing countries,” said Engel.

They chose to use this post-consumer plastic to fabricate the Circleg, reducing the material cost by half and utilising locally available plastic waste for production. The recycled plastic is reinforced with glass fibre to increase the stability.Circleg recycled plastic prosthetic leg

Oschwald and Engel went on a trip to Kenya during the prototyping phase to research the current recycling processes and to observe the lifestyle requirements of their potential users.

“This user-centred approach enabled us to integrate the needs and requirements of those affected into the design process,” said the designers. “Subsequently, we designed and developed a prosthetic solution tailored to the Kenyan context.”

Source of the Article: Dezeen.com

Prosthetic leg for Amputees designed by Jae-Hyun An to encourage new genre of ballet

Source of the Article: Dezeen.com
Prosthetic ballet leg for amputees encourages new genre of dancePratt Institute graduate Jae-Hyun An has created a prosthetic leg that allows amputees to perform ballet like never before. Unlike regular artificial limbs, which are designed to mimic the human body, the Marie-T enables amputee ballet dancers to enhance their performance. Made up of three components, Marie-T features a weighty foam-injected rotational moulded foot, with a stainless-steel toe and rubber grip that help provide the dancer with balance and momentum during rotations.

In mainstream ballet, dancers typically move in and out of the pointe position – when all body weight is supported by the tips of fully extended feet within pointe shoes. However, because of the immense strain on the foot and ankle of a performer, it is impossible for a ballet dancer to constantly perform in this position. Jae-Hyun An, who studied on the Pratt’s Industrial Design programme, designed the carbon-fibre Marie-T to enable amputees to dance on pointe throughout a performance.Jae-Hyun An designs prosthetic leg for ballet called Marie-T

New York-based An said the design, which is named after 19th-century Swedish ballet dancer Marie Taglioni, could encourage amputees to develop a new choreography that has never been achieved by mainstream ballerinas. “I wanted to explore what would happen if you could allow a person to perform on pointe 100 per cent of the time,” said An, who developed Marie-T over the course of four months. “How would ballet change? I wanted to create a tool for someone to take and let their imagination define the capabilities of the product.”

Prosthetic ballet leg for amputees encourages new genre of dance

During research, An realised that a weak ankle can twist and cause a ballerina in pointe position to wobble. In response, An designed a strong and stable ankle area that helps the ballerina stay in balance. The ankle connects to a slightly curved carbon-fibre limb which helps absorb the shock from the impact of the ballet dancer stepping forward. The limb is topped by a 3D-printed socket with steel round head screws. Ill-fitting prosthetic limbs can cause blisters and rashes on dancers, so An designed the Marie-T so that the parts can be easily switched out when they become well worn or need to be resized. The designer told Dezeen: “Prosthetics by itself is such a powerful and inspirational design. Any form of it is really amazing! Whether it is Hugh Herr’s bionic legs from the Biomechatronics Group in MIT, or the Flex-Foot Cheetah Leg from Ossur, or even a peg leg from… whenever.”

“It is inspiring because the technology is incredible but even more so because of the immense struggle an amputee has to overcome to use these products. Some argue that some of these prostheses give amputees a certain advantage in specific tasks, but I am not sure they would say the same if they ever saw how much training and care it takes to handle a prosthesis,” he continued.

“In my research I came across Viktoria Modesta and she re-interpreted performance with her prosthetics. It was visually so powerful and opened a completely new area of prosthetics for me. I fell in love with the idea of designing something that could expand the artistic and cultural scene of a community with prosthetic users.”

Prosthetic ballet leg for amputees encourages new genre of dance

AI IS FUELING SMARTER PROSTHETICS THAN EVER BEFORE

By Andrea Powell

THE DISTANCE BETWEEN prosthetic and real is shrinking. Thanks to advances in batteries, brain-controlled robotics, and AI, today’s mechanical limbs can do everything from twist and point to grab and lift. And this isn’t just good news for amputees. “For something like bomb disposal, why not use a robotic arm?” says Justin Sanchez, manager of Darpa’s Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. Well, that would certainly be handy.

Brain-Operated Arm

Capable of: Touching hands, reaching out
Mind-controlled limbs aren’t new, but University of Pittsburgh scientists are working on an arm that can feel. Wires link the arm and brain, so when pressure is applied, a signal alerts the sensory cortex.

Hand That Sees

Capable of: Looking for an opportunity
Researchers at Newcastle University have designed a hand with a tiny camera that snaps pics of objects in its view. Then an AI determines an action. Like, grasp that beer and raise it to my mouth.

The Linx

Capable of: Climbing every mountain
Unlike older lower-limb prosthetics, the Linx can tell when it’s sitting in a chair. At just under 6 pounds, it relies on seven sensors that collect data on activity and terrain, helping the leg adapt to new situations.

Bebionic

Capable of: Making rude gestures
It’s the only prosthetic hand with air-bubbled fingertips—great for typing and handling delicate objects (like eggs). And because individual motors power natural movements, wearers can flip the bird in an instant.

The Michelangelo

Capable of: Painting masterpieces
Whereas many prosthetics have a stiff thumb, Ottobock designed this model with a secondary drive unit in the fattest finger—making it opposable. So it’s easier to hold, say, a paintbrush. Big thumbs up!

The LUKE Arm

Capable of: Wielding lightsabers
Yep, LUKE as in Skywalker. The Life Under Kinetic Evolution arm is the first muscle- controlled prosthetic to be cleared by the FDA. With up to 10 motors in the arm, the Force is definitely with this one.

Source of the Article: Wired.com

Hi-tech legs help amputee reporter snowboard

The prosthetics experts at Dorset Orthopaedic and Ottobock have been featured in an exciting episode of the BBC’s flagship technology programme, BBC Click.

Available on BBC News Channels and on iPlayer, the programme focuses on the technology behind the upcoming 2018 Winter Paralympics. BBC Click reporter and double below-knee amputee Kathleen Hawkins had the chance to try out the ground-breaking ski and snowboarding prosthesis, the Ottobock ProCarve which helps Paralympic skiers and snowboarders compete at the highest level.

The programme follows Kathleen during a fitting with Dorset Orthopaedic Clinic Prosthetist Kevin Shaw, who explained the unique advantages of the ProCarve for snowboarders. Kathleen was then joined by Ottobock Head of Prosthetics, Emma Gillespie for the ultimate test: using the ProCarves on the slopes. The ProCarve can fit into a snowboarding boot, and has a pneumatic spring and a large, air-filled cylinder at the ankle joint that act as a shock absorber. This increases the rider’s comfort and also contributes to a better body position whilst boarding. The air pressure inside the cylinder can be tailored to suit the individual’s riding style and type of terrain.

Kathleen commented: “Getting to try out the ProCarve feet for BBC Click was such a fun and interesting experience. I’ve snowboarded (badly) in the past and it was great to feel a different sensation on the snow and think about the independence these feet could give to amputees wanting to get on the slopes with confidence. It’s the best aspect of technology for me. Now I just need to save my pennies.”

“I hope that this programme will give people some insight into the work that goes on behind the scenes to help para-athletes at every level to perform at their best, from fitting and alignment to making sure you have a good socket,” said Kevin, who has over 30 years’ experience in prosthetics.

Emma added: “This is a wonderful opportunity to showcase the kind of product that can help someone achieve their dreams, whether that’s to be a Paralympian or just get out on the slopes for a few hours. This is exactly why Ottobock are constantly investing in research and development, to be at the cutting edge of prosthetic technology used for sports and everyday life.”

In addition to creating specialist winter sports prostheses such as the ProCarve, Ottobock is the Official Prosthetic, Orthotic and Wheelchair Technical Service Provider for the PyeongChang 2018 Paralympic Winter Games. These Paralympic Winter Games will be the biggest to date, with 80 medal events in six sports: Para alpine skiing, Para biathlon, Para cross-country skiing, Ice sledge hockey, Para snowboard and Wheelchair curling. With 670 athletes from 42 nations expected to compete, Ottobock technicians will be busy repairing wheelchairs, sit-skis, and any other equipment athlete or members of the Paralympic Family rely on for competition and everyday life.

As featured on the BBC Reporter Kat Hawkins tried out prosthetic feet designed for skiing and snowboarding.

Article source: Pos’ability Magazine (posabilitymagazine.co.uk)