Video of joyful Afghan boy dancing on new prosthetic leg goes viral

Ahmad Rahman had to have his leg amputated after he was shot as a baby in Logar province

Beaming young Afghan amputee dances on new prosthetic leg – video

When Ahmad Rahman was eight months old he and his sister, Salima, were injured when fighting broke out between Afghan government forces and the Taliban in their village in Logar province. Rahman was shot in the leg, which was later amputated.

His story is one of tens of thousands in Afghanistan, of people losing limbs due to war, but a video of him testing out his new prosthetic leg has provided a moment of joy.

The footage – filmed by physiotherapist Mulkara Rahimi at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) orthopaedic clinic in Kabul – has gone viral, showing a smiling young boy dancing after being fitted with his new leg – his fourth because they need to be replaced as he grows up. It gained more than 12,000 views in the first 12 hours.

The video of Rahman was also shared on social media by the ICRC’s Roya Musawi, and has been viewed more than 980,000 times in her tweet alone.

The ICRC’s clinic has registered almost 178,000 patients with disabilities in Afghanistan, including more than 46,100 amputees, since it started logging the injuries in 1988.

More than a million people in Afghanistan suffer some form of disability, many through injuries from four decades of war.

Of the ICRC patients who have lost limbs, almost two-thirds are due to landmines, improvised explosive devices, and other war remnants.

The video has brought global attention to the centre, its director, Alberto Cairo, told the Washington Post.

Source of the Article: TheGuardian.com

3-year-old Gets New Legs, Learns To Walk For First Time

After living most of her life without legs, a 3-year-old Cuban girl took a big first step toward a normal life Monday. Doctors amputated both of Alexa Prieto’s legs when she was just 3-months-old.

Her mother had taken her to the hospital in Havana for intestinal issues, but the infant contracted gangrene and Alexa had to lose her legs to save her life. Because she was so young at the time, Alexa has never walked in her life.

After undergoing surgery last fall to prepare for the prosthetics, Shriners Hospital for Children in Tampa fitted the toddler with a pair of temporary legs, allowing her to stand for the first time. It was a moment her mother Jacqueline Vidal, called “very emotional.”

“Everybody’s waiting for this moment,” Vidal said through the help of a translator. “They’ve been waiting for a long time to see her walk.”

Armando Quirantes, a Cuban-born prosthesis specialist, saw Alexa’s story on television and decided to sponsor the little girl, bringing her to Florida for treatment.

“She brought her little girl to the hospital for a simple intestinal problem, and she returned with a little girl with no legs,” Quirantes said, referring to Vidal.

Dr. Bryan Sinnott, a senior prosthetist at Shriners, explained that Alexa’s temporary prosthetics are clear, allowing them to see and adjust should the toddler encounter any issues while learning how to use them.

“Because she’s a child she’s going to learn very well, very fast,” he said. “I think she’s going to do really good.”

While he called it amazing to see Alexa stand for the first time, Sinnott says watching Vidal in that moment was truly the vision.

“You watch how a mom takes in the fact her child is standing, it’s a wonderful thing,” he said. “I’m just lucky to be a part of all this.”

Contact Teter Orthotics & Prosthetics for any prosthetic or orthotic care questions or needs. We’ve been providing expert prosthetic and orthotic services in Michigan since 1955 and have grown to  22 locations, including Traverse City, Alma, Kalamazoo, Marquette, and Gaylord!

 

Source of the Article: teterop.com

Logan students spend year building special prosthetic leg

A group of Logan High School students spent the entire year creating a prosthetic limb, which simultaneously charges while the person walks.

The InvenTeam talked with members in the industry, who told stories of patients not being able to enjoy long trips outdoors for fear of losing power.

Logan teacher Steve Johnston said the class provides a unique opportunity.

“I try to always emphasize with the kids that we want to give them a unique engineering experience,” Johnston said. “We also want to make sure the item can help people in everyday life.”

The project faced several obstacles that the students had to overcome, including starting from scratch.

“We can’t test this on a human subject,” Johnston said. “We had to spend more time creating a tester to simulate the heel strike and foot motion to harvest energy from it.”

A bluetooth device in the leg allows a user to view the power remaining on their cellphone. The battery is charged by a person’s heel striking the ground.

A pair of engineers were brought in during the year to help students with the project.

The group will now give a presentation on their invention at the EurekaFest at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), as well as tour the area.

Source of the Article: wizmnews.com

Endolite Invests in Expanded US Sales Organization

Endolite Invests in Expanded US Sales Organization

Following continued growth in its US prosthetics business, Endolite is pleased to announce the expansion of its sales organization in order to better service its US customers.

John Braddock has been appointed Vice President of Sales and Marketing, effective April 1, 2019. John will be responsible for overseeing all commercial aspects of the US business, including the sales team, customer services, field-based clinical education and marketing.  John has been with Endolite for over 5 years and was most recently the National Sales Manager for Endolite and before that, the West Regional Sales Manager.

Brad Mattear (LO, CPA, CFo) joins Endolite as National Account Manager.  Brad previously worked for Cascade Orthopedic Supply, Inc. as the Central US & National Strategic Account Manager and most recently as the Vice President of Orthotics and Business Development for Nabtesco Proteor USA.

Roxanne Owens joins Endolite as Regional Manager – West. Roxanne will be responsible for overseeing a team of 8 Territory Managers, covering the west region.  Roxanne previously worked for Ossur as a Clinical Account Manager, Senior Area Manager, Regional Sales Manager and most recently as the Sr. Vice President of Sales and Marketing for CKI Locker LLC dba American Locker.

Finally Bryce Mathews joins Endolite as Territory Manager, responsible for sales in southern Illinois and Indiana.  Bryce previously worked as Territory Sales Manager and Senior Territory Manager for Thuasne USA.

John Braddock commented, “Endolite’s US business continues to grow and it’s important we are able to maintain a high level of customer service, both personally in the field and from our base in Ohio.  We are excited about adding to our team in key locations and look forward to continuing to build valuable partnerships with our customers across the country.”

About Endolite and Blatchford:

Endolite is part of the Blatchford Group, a UK-based, world-leading rehabilitation provider with clinical expertise in prosthetics, orthotics, special seating and wheelchairs. With offices in the UK, USA, France, Germany, Norway and India, Blatchford designs and manufactures the multi award-winning Endolite range of lower limb prostheses and provides clinical services to civilian, military and international patients.  With 128 years of expertise in innovation, it produces the world’s most advanced microprocessor-controlled artificial limbs.­­­­­

The first dexterous and sentient hand prosthesis has been successfully implanted

Source: Chalmers University of Technology

Summary:A Swedish patient with hand amputation has become the first recipient of an osseo-neuromuscular implant to control a dexterous hand prosthesis. In a pioneering surgery, titanium implants were placed in the two forearm bones (radius and ulnar), from which electrodes to nerves and muscle were extended to extract signals to control a robotic hand and to provide tactile sensations. This makes it the first clinically viable, dexterous and sentient prosthetic hand usable in real life.

A female Swedish patient with hand amputation has become the first recipient of an osseo-neuromuscular implant to control a dexterous hand prosthesis. In a pioneering surgery, titanium implants were placed in the two forearm bones (radius and ulnar), from which electrodes to nerves and muscle were extended to extract signals to control a robotic hand and to provide tactile sensations. This makes it the first clinically viable, dexterous and sentient prosthetic hand usable in real life. The breakthrough is part of the European project DeTOP.

The new implant technology was developed in Sweden by a team lead by Dr. Max Ortiz Catalan at Integrum AB — the company behind the first bone-anchored limb prosthesis using osseointegration — and Chalmers University of Technology. This first-of-its-kind surgery, led by Prof. Rickard Brånemark and Dr. Paolo Sassu, took place at Sahlgrenska University Hospital as part of a larger project funded by the European Commission under Horizon 2020 called DeTOP (GA #687905).

The DeTOP project is coordinated by Prof. Christian Cipriani at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, and also includes Prensilia, the University of Gothenburg, Lund University, University of Essex, the Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology, INAIL Prosthetic Center, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, and the Instituto Ortopedico Rizzoli.

Conventional prosthetic hands rely on electrodes placed over the skin to extract control signals from the underlying stump muscles. These superficial electrodes deliver limited and unreliable signals that only allow control of a couple of gross movements (opening and closing the hand). Richer and more reliable information can be obtained by implanting electrodes in all remaining muscle in the stump instead. Sixteen electrodes were implanted in this first patient in order to achieve more dexterous control of a novel prosthetic hand developed in Italy by the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna and Prensilia.

Current prosthetic hands have also limited sensory feedback. They do not provide tactile or kinesthetic sensation, so the user can only rely on vision while using the prosthesis. Users cannot tell how strongly an object is grasped, or even when contact has been made. By implanting electrodes in the nerves that used to be connected to the lost biological sensors of the hand, researchers can electrically stimulate these nerves in a similar manner as information conveyed by the biological hand. This results in the patient perceiving sensations originating in the new prosthetic hand, as it is equipped with sensors that drive the stimulation of the nerve to deliver such sensations.

One of the most important aspects of this work is that this is the first technology usable in daily life. This means it is not limited to a research laboratory. The Swedish group — Integrum AB and Chalmers University of Technology — have previously demonstrated that control of a sentient prosthesis in daily life was possible in above-elbow amputees using similar technology. This was not possible in below-elbow amputees where there are two smaller bones rather than a single larger one as in the upper arm. This posed several challenges on the development of the implant system. On the other hand, it also presents an opportunity to achieve a more dexterous control of an artificial replacement. This is because many more muscles are available to extract neural commands in below-elbow amputations.

Bones weaken if they are not used (loaded), as commonly happen after amputation. The patient is following a rehabilitation program to regain the strength in her forearm bones to be able to fully load the prosthetic hand. In parallel, she is also relearning how to control her missing hand using virtual reality, and in few weeks, she will be using a prosthetic hand with increasing function and sensations in her daily life. Two more patients will be implanted with this new generation of prosthetic hands in the upcoming months, in Italy and Sweden.

“Several advanced prosthetic technologies have been reported in the last decade, but unfortunately they have remained as research concepts used only for short periods of time in controlled environments” says Dr. Ortiz Catalan, Assoc. Prof. at Chalmers University of the Technology and head of the Biomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Lab, who has led this development since its beginning 10 years ago, initially in above-elbow amputations. “The breakthrough of our technology consists on enabling patients to use implanted neuromuscular interfaces to control their prosthesis while perceiving sensations where it matters for them, in their daily life.”

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EES8U5LwaUs&feature=youtu.be

Source of the article: Sciencedaily.com

Open Bionics’ 3D-printed prosthetic arm is now available in the US

Hero Arm debuted in the UK last year.
by Christine Fisher
Open Bionics

One year after Open Bionics began selling its 3D-printed Hero Armprosthetic in the UK, the bionic arm is available in the US. Open Bionics has made a name for itself as a start-up specializing in low-cost prosthetics, and you might remember it as the company behind arms inspired by Iron Man, Star Wars, Frozen and Deus Ex. But until now, the Hero Arm has only been available in the UK and France.

 

Thanks to 3D scanning and printing, Open Bionics can custom build each arm, and do so faster and cheaper than its competitors. According to the company, Hero Arm’s muscle sensors enable lifelike precision and multiple grips. Motors allow for haptic feedback and beepers and lights provide other notifications to the wearer. Even with all of that technology, the arm weighs less than a kilogram, and it can be used by anyone over the age of eight. You can see more of the features in the video below.

Cardiff boy, 7, finally walks after losing both legs aged 3

Romeo was diagnosed with purpura fulminans after complaining of leg pain

Romeo Hadley was three years old when he lost both his legs.

Now seven, after 18 months of hard work, he can walk on prosthetic limbs.

Romeo had complained of leg pains before he was diagnosed with purpura fulminans, a thrombotic condition that causes necrosis and blood coagulation.

“He had to lose his legs to stay alive…. although that sounds devastating and awful we took him home and that was enough for us,” explained his mother Katie Hadley, from Cardiff.

The experience of seeing her son so unwell has stayed with her.

Romeo in hospitalImage copyrightFAMILY HANDOUT
Image captionRomeo spent six months in hospital

“It was horrendous and I will never forget it, and even speaking about it now… we don’t speak about it, we stay very positive for Romeo because he is positive,” she said.

“He’s an amazing little boy who’s very very lucky to be alive. So we don’t go back to that time to be honest.”

Romeo spent six months in hospital before he was able to come home. But adapting to life without his legs was hard.

By October 2017, he was able to stand on his prosthetics but did not enjoy using them at home so Mrs Hadley arranged for him to start taking them into school.

Romeo learned to walk on his prosthetics at school

A year later she received a video of Romeo finally walking without a frame with the assistance of his teacher.

“I was blown away,” she said.

“My husband and I, our whole family, [my daughter] Seren, everyone, was so emotional to see how well he’s done.

“If he can do that now, what can he do in the future?”

The Hadley family
Image caption The Hadley family from left to right: Jonathan, Seren, Romeo and Katie

Romeo loves playing football and dreams of being a professional basketball player.

“My husband and I are here to just make him psychologically strong enough to cope with life in the future,” said Mrs Hadley.

“Romeo loves life, he’s gorgeous, and he’s absolutely the happiness in this house.

“He gets on with life… he enjoys every single moment.”

Romeo’s mother says he is lucky to be alive

Source of the article: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46152647?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/topics/cq23pdgvrdwt/prosthetics&link_location=live-reporting-story

Woman is given first robotic hand that allows user to touch and feel

The battery-powered limb could be available on the NHS within a few years, British researchers say

By Martin Bagot Health And Science Correspondent

(Image: Dr Max Ortiz Catalan)

The first robotic hand that enables the amputee to touch and feel has been given to a Swedish woman.

The revolutionary mechanical limb is controlled by electrodes connected to nerves and muscles in the stump

Signals pass “tactile sensations” to the nerves while allowing the body to control a range of motions similar to a real hand.

British researchers involved in the EU-funded project say the battery-powered limb could be available on the NHS within a few years.

The prosthetic could soon be available on the NHS (Image: PA)

Dr Luca Citi, of Essex University, said: “This is a big thing. Currently amputees would have to watch their prosthetic hand if they are picking up, say a plastic cup, to check they are not crushing it.

Source of the Article: https://www.mirror.co.uk/science/woman-given-first-robotic-hand-13956377

Schoolgirl with no hand gets bionic arm as Christmas gift from mystery donor

Evie Lambert, 11, will be able to open Christmas gifts for the first time thanks to ‘a real-life Santa’

An anonymous donor has gifted Evie a 3D-printed prosthetic arm (Image: Mercury Press & Media)

A girl has been given the perfect early Christmas gift of a bionic arm and will be able to open her presents unaided for the first time.

Evie Lambert, 11, was born with no left hand and was delighted when a kind-hearted anonymous donor paid for her £10,000 3D-printed arm.

Now Evie is looking forward to opening her presents on Christmas morning with her “Frozen” themed arm.

She said: “I want to say a big thank you to the donor. It is the best Christmas present ever.

“It will really help me to do things that I struggled to do before. It feels really comfortable wearing it and the hand opens and closes like a real hand. I’d love to get make-up for Christmas and now I’ll be able to put mascara on.”

Her mum Sally, 47, of Huddersfield, West Yorks said: “She couldn’t have wished for a better Christmas present.

She will now be able to open – and help wrap – presents this Christmas (Image: Mercury Press & Media)
Evie was born with no left hand (Image: Mercury Press & Media)

“If she could have put anything on her wish list it would have been this. The donor is like a real-life Santa.

“It gives her functionality. It’s the simple things that she’s enjoying doing now – like being able to hold and open a can of pop, brushing her hair, opening a lip balm or putting clothes on a hanger, things that we take for granted.

Evie Lambert with brother Henry (Image: Mercury Press & Media)

“When she does it her face just lights up.

“The most amazing thing will be seeing her open her presents on Christmas day. I’m also going to have her help me wrap Christmas gifts.”

Sally and her husband Duncan, 49, found out at the 20-week scan that Evie had no left hand.

Her arm has a Frozen design theme (Image: Mercury Press & Media)

Sally, who also has an eight-year-old son Henry, said: “We have had incidents where people have called her names and there have been stares, but I think she’s built up a resilience to it.”

The family heard about Bristol-based Open Bionics at a conference in September.

Soon after they got a call to say a donor had paid for a prosthetic for Evie, whose arm was fitted in November.

Sally said: “It’s the kind of thing you think happens to other people. It’s amazing.

“It’s such an act of kindness – you don’t think these people exist.”

Source of the article: https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/school-girl-no-hand-gets-13755653

3-year-old Cuban girl who lost both legs to gangrene stands for first time with prosthetics

By 

A three-year-old Cuban girl was able to part with her wheelchair and stand up for the first time after losing both her limbs to an illness just months after she was born.

On Monday, the toddler was fitted for temporary prosthetics at the Shriners Hospital for Children in Tampa, Fla.

Her mother, Jaqueline Vidal, told WFLA News that it was “very emotional” seeing her daughter stand for the first time.

“Everybody’s waiting for this moment,” Vidal told a WFLA reporter with the help of a translator. “They’ve been waiting a long time to see her walk.”

Alexa Prieto developed gangrene while she was being treated for intestinal issues at a hospital in Havana when she was only three months old. To save her life, doctors had to amputate both of her legs.

Prieto was sponsored by a Cuban-born orthopedics specialist named Armando Quirantes, who brought her to Florida to be fitted for prosthetics.

The toddler underwent surgery to prepare for the prosthetics last fall, WFLA reported.

Dr. Bryan Sinnott, a senior prosthesis specialist at the Tampa hospital, said Prieto’s prosthetics are clear so that his team can identify problems and make adjustments as the three-year-old becomes familiar with her new set of legs.

Source of the Article: https://globalnews.ca/news/4876820/cuban-girl-gangrene-prosthetics/