Video of joyful Afghan boy dancing on new prosthetic leg goes viral

Ahmad Rahman had to have his leg amputated after he was shot as a baby in Logar province

Beaming young Afghan amputee dances on new prosthetic leg – video

When Ahmad Rahman was eight months old he and his sister, Salima, were injured when fighting broke out between Afghan government forces and the Taliban in their village in Logar province. Rahman was shot in the leg, which was later amputated.

His story is one of tens of thousands in Afghanistan, of people losing limbs due to war, but a video of him testing out his new prosthetic leg has provided a moment of joy.

The footage – filmed by physiotherapist Mulkara Rahimi at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) orthopaedic clinic in Kabul – has gone viral, showing a smiling young boy dancing after being fitted with his new leg – his fourth because they need to be replaced as he grows up. It gained more than 12,000 views in the first 12 hours.

The video of Rahman was also shared on social media by the ICRC’s Roya Musawi, and has been viewed more than 980,000 times in her tweet alone.

The ICRC’s clinic has registered almost 178,000 patients with disabilities in Afghanistan, including more than 46,100 amputees, since it started logging the injuries in 1988.

More than a million people in Afghanistan suffer some form of disability, many through injuries from four decades of war.

Of the ICRC patients who have lost limbs, almost two-thirds are due to landmines, improvised explosive devices, and other war remnants.

The video has brought global attention to the centre, its director, Alberto Cairo, told the Washington Post.

Source of the Article: TheGuardian.com

3-year-old Gets New Legs, Learns To Walk For First Time

After living most of her life without legs, a 3-year-old Cuban girl took a big first step toward a normal life Monday. Doctors amputated both of Alexa Prieto’s legs when she was just 3-months-old.

Her mother had taken her to the hospital in Havana for intestinal issues, but the infant contracted gangrene and Alexa had to lose her legs to save her life. Because she was so young at the time, Alexa has never walked in her life.

After undergoing surgery last fall to prepare for the prosthetics, Shriners Hospital for Children in Tampa fitted the toddler with a pair of temporary legs, allowing her to stand for the first time. It was a moment her mother Jacqueline Vidal, called “very emotional.”

“Everybody’s waiting for this moment,” Vidal said through the help of a translator. “They’ve been waiting for a long time to see her walk.”

Armando Quirantes, a Cuban-born prosthesis specialist, saw Alexa’s story on television and decided to sponsor the little girl, bringing her to Florida for treatment.

“She brought her little girl to the hospital for a simple intestinal problem, and she returned with a little girl with no legs,” Quirantes said, referring to Vidal.

Dr. Bryan Sinnott, a senior prosthetist at Shriners, explained that Alexa’s temporary prosthetics are clear, allowing them to see and adjust should the toddler encounter any issues while learning how to use them.

“Because she’s a child she’s going to learn very well, very fast,” he said. “I think she’s going to do really good.”

While he called it amazing to see Alexa stand for the first time, Sinnott says watching Vidal in that moment was truly the vision.

“You watch how a mom takes in the fact her child is standing, it’s a wonderful thing,” he said. “I’m just lucky to be a part of all this.”

Contact Teter Orthotics & Prosthetics for any prosthetic or orthotic care questions or needs. We’ve been providing expert prosthetic and orthotic services in Michigan since 1955 and have grown to  22 locations, including Traverse City, Alma, Kalamazoo, Marquette, and Gaylord!

 

Source of the Article: teterop.com

BIONIC LIMBS ‘LEARN’ TO OPEN A BEER

By Eric Niller

INFINITE BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES

ANDREW RUBIN SITS with a Surface tablet, watching a white skeletal hand open and close on its screen. Rubin’s right hand was amputated a year ago, but he follows these motions with a special device fitted to his upper arm.

Electrodes on his arm connect to a box that records the patterns of nerve signals firing, allowing Rubin to train a prosthetic limb to act like a real hand. “When I think of closing a hand, it’s going to contract certain muscles in my forearm,” he says. “The software recognizes the patterns created when I flex or extend a hand that I do not have.”

The 49-year-old college professor from Washington, DC, drives several times a month to Infinite Biomedical Technologies, a Baltimore startup company that is using deep learning algorithms to recognize the signals in his upper arm that correspond with various hand movements.

Each year, more than 150,000 people have a limb amputated after an accident or for various medical reasons. Most people are then fitted with a prosthetic device that can recognize a limited number of signals to control a hand or foot, for example.

But Infinite and another firm are taking advantage of better signal processing, pattern recognition software and other engineering advances to build new prosthetic controllers that might give Rubin and others an easier life. The key is boosting the amount of data the prosthetic arm can receive, and helping it interpret that information. “The goal for most patients is to get more than two functions, say open or close, or a wrist turn. Pattern recognition allows us to do that,” says Rahul Kaliki, CEO of Infinite. “We are now capturing more activity across the limb.”

Kaliki’s team of 14 employees are building the electronics that go inside other companies’ prosthetic arms. Infinite’s electronic control system, called Sense, records data from up to eight electrodes on his upper arm. Through many hours of training on the company’s tablet app, the device can detect the intent encoded in Rubin’s nerve signals when he moves his upper arm in a certain way. Sense then instructs his prosthetic hand to assume the appropriate grip.

Last Friday, Infinite’s Kaliki received notice from FDA officials that Sense had been approved for sale in the United States. Kaliki says he expects to begin installing them in prosthetic limbs by the end of November. In 2017, FDA officials approved a similar system by Chicago-based Coapt. Today more than 400 people are using the system at home, according to CEO Blair Lock.

COAPT

Lock started as an engineer 13 years ago at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, an affiliate of Northwestern University. He worked with surgeons who were repairing nerve damage in amputee patients. Over time, he realized that building better prosthetics would be easier if he could figure out a way to pick up better signals from the body, he says. “What’s new is providing a much more natural, more intuitive method of control using [bio-electronic] signals,” Lock says.

In earlier versions of prosthetic devices, electrodes recorded signal strengths “but it was like listening to an orchestra and only knowing how loud the instruments are playing,” Lock says. “It was a significant effort to learn the content and fidelity of the signals.” The Coapt system works inside an amputee’s prosthetic hand and costs about $10,000 to $15,000, depending on the amount of customization needed. Artificial limbs can costs anywhere from $10,000 to $150,000, according to Lock.

Nicole Kelly got a new prosthetic device with the Coapt control system about a year ago. Now the 28-year-old Chicagoan can grind fresh pepper into her food and hold playing cards with friends. She can also open a beer.

“For many things, it wasn’t that I couldn’t do them before, but suddenly I can do them much easier,” says Kelly, who was born without her lower left arm.nHer prosthetic “is not my body, and it’s not 100 percent natural,” she said. “There’s a learning curve of my body communicating with this technology. Even the process of the best way to hold the salt and pepper shakers, I am essentially doing it for the first time.”

Source of the Article: https://www.wired.com/story/bionic-limbs-learn-to-open-a-beer/