Bath boy campaigns to recycle prosthetic legs

An 11-year-old amputee is championing a charity’s campaign to recycle children’s prosthetic legs.

Euan Murray, from Bath, was born with a birth defect that meant his left leg had to be amputated below the knee when he was 11 months old.

He realised his outgrown legs could benefit others and has donated 10 old prosthetic legs through Legs4Africa.

“I feel proud because I was once wearing these and I’m giving them to people that really need them,” he said.

“The prosthetic leg enables me to do everything I’m passionate for, which is mainly sport.

“If I didn’t have a leg and I was still an amputee, I would be a very different person because I would be stuck in a wheelchair and I would miss out on a lot.”

Euan playing a drum kit at homeCREATED BY TEN
Euan’s mum found out about the charity on social media and he immediately wanted to donate his old legs

Tom Williams, founder of the Bristol-based charity, said Euan was doing “a fantastic thing”.

“I never fail to be full of admiration for the little ones who accept their new leg as part of their life and don’t allow it to define who they are,” he said.

“There is a huge demand for components to build children’s prosthetics in Africa.”

The charity collects and recycles prosthetic limbs sourced from UK hospitals and private donors and then ships them to Africa where they are adapted and fitted by trained technicians at partnering hospitals.

One of Euan’s legs has been given to Wudeh, a seven-year-old girl in The Gambia whose leg was amputated following a car accident.

Euan and his family have seen pictures of Wudeh on Facebook wearing his old leg which he said was “really amazing”.

Euan issued a direct message to Wudeh, saying: “I hope this leg enables you to do everything it helped me to do and it brings you happiness in your life.”

Wudeh with one of Euan's old prosthetic legsCREATED BY TEN
Wudeh now has one of Euan’s old prosthetic legs
source of the Article: BBC.co.uk

Schoolgirl with no hand gets bionic arm as Christmas gift from mystery donor

Evie Lambert, 11, will be able to open Christmas gifts for the first time thanks to ‘a real-life Santa’

An anonymous donor has gifted Evie a 3D-printed prosthetic arm (Image: Mercury Press & Media)

A girl has been given the perfect early Christmas gift of a bionic arm and will be able to open her presents unaided for the first time.

Evie Lambert, 11, was born with no left hand and was delighted when a kind-hearted anonymous donor paid for her £10,000 3D-printed arm.

Now Evie is looking forward to opening her presents on Christmas morning with her “Frozen” themed arm.

She said: “I want to say a big thank you to the donor. It is the best Christmas present ever.

“It will really help me to do things that I struggled to do before. It feels really comfortable wearing it and the hand opens and closes like a real hand. I’d love to get make-up for Christmas and now I’ll be able to put mascara on.”

Her mum Sally, 47, of Huddersfield, West Yorks said: “She couldn’t have wished for a better Christmas present.

She will now be able to open – and help wrap – presents this Christmas (Image: Mercury Press & Media)
Evie was born with no left hand (Image: Mercury Press & Media)

“If she could have put anything on her wish list it would have been this. The donor is like a real-life Santa.

“It gives her functionality. It’s the simple things that she’s enjoying doing now – like being able to hold and open a can of pop, brushing her hair, opening a lip balm or putting clothes on a hanger, things that we take for granted.

Evie Lambert with brother Henry (Image: Mercury Press & Media)

“When she does it her face just lights up.

“The most amazing thing will be seeing her open her presents on Christmas day. I’m also going to have her help me wrap Christmas gifts.”

Sally and her husband Duncan, 49, found out at the 20-week scan that Evie had no left hand.

Her arm has a Frozen design theme (Image: Mercury Press & Media)

Sally, who also has an eight-year-old son Henry, said: “We have had incidents where people have called her names and there have been stares, but I think she’s built up a resilience to it.”

The family heard about Bristol-based Open Bionics at a conference in September.

Soon after they got a call to say a donor had paid for a prosthetic for Evie, whose arm was fitted in November.

Sally said: “It’s the kind of thing you think happens to other people. It’s amazing.

“It’s such an act of kindness – you don’t think these people exist.”

Source of the article: https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/school-girl-no-hand-gets-13755653