Video of joyful Afghan boy dancing on new prosthetic leg goes viral

Ahmad Rahman had to have his leg amputated after he was shot as a baby in Logar province

Beaming young Afghan amputee dances on new prosthetic leg – video

When Ahmad Rahman was eight months old he and his sister, Salima, were injured when fighting broke out between Afghan government forces and the Taliban in their village in Logar province. Rahman was shot in the leg, which was later amputated.

His story is one of tens of thousands in Afghanistan, of people losing limbs due to war, but a video of him testing out his new prosthetic leg has provided a moment of joy.

The footage – filmed by physiotherapist Mulkara Rahimi at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) orthopaedic clinic in Kabul – has gone viral, showing a smiling young boy dancing after being fitted with his new leg – his fourth because they need to be replaced as he grows up. It gained more than 12,000 views in the first 12 hours.

The video of Rahman was also shared on social media by the ICRC’s Roya Musawi, and has been viewed more than 980,000 times in her tweet alone.

The ICRC’s clinic has registered almost 178,000 patients with disabilities in Afghanistan, including more than 46,100 amputees, since it started logging the injuries in 1988.

More than a million people in Afghanistan suffer some form of disability, many through injuries from four decades of war.

Of the ICRC patients who have lost limbs, almost two-thirds are due to landmines, improvised explosive devices, and other war remnants.

The video has brought global attention to the centre, its director, Alberto Cairo, told the Washington Post.

Source of the Article: TheGuardian.com

Cardiff boy, 7, finally walks after losing both legs aged 3

Romeo was diagnosed with purpura fulminans after complaining of leg pain

Romeo Hadley was three years old when he lost both his legs.

Now seven, after 18 months of hard work, he can walk on prosthetic limbs.

Romeo had complained of leg pains before he was diagnosed with purpura fulminans, a thrombotic condition that causes necrosis and blood coagulation.

“He had to lose his legs to stay alive…. although that sounds devastating and awful we took him home and that was enough for us,” explained his mother Katie Hadley, from Cardiff.

The experience of seeing her son so unwell has stayed with her.

Romeo in hospitalImage copyrightFAMILY HANDOUT
Image captionRomeo spent six months in hospital

“It was horrendous and I will never forget it, and even speaking about it now… we don’t speak about it, we stay very positive for Romeo because he is positive,” she said.

“He’s an amazing little boy who’s very very lucky to be alive. So we don’t go back to that time to be honest.”

Romeo spent six months in hospital before he was able to come home. But adapting to life without his legs was hard.

By October 2017, he was able to stand on his prosthetics but did not enjoy using them at home so Mrs Hadley arranged for him to start taking them into school.

Romeo learned to walk on his prosthetics at school

A year later she received a video of Romeo finally walking without a frame with the assistance of his teacher.

“I was blown away,” she said.

“My husband and I, our whole family, [my daughter] Seren, everyone, was so emotional to see how well he’s done.

“If he can do that now, what can he do in the future?”

The Hadley family
Image caption The Hadley family from left to right: Jonathan, Seren, Romeo and Katie

Romeo loves playing football and dreams of being a professional basketball player.

“My husband and I are here to just make him psychologically strong enough to cope with life in the future,” said Mrs Hadley.

“Romeo loves life, he’s gorgeous, and he’s absolutely the happiness in this house.

“He gets on with life… he enjoys every single moment.”

Romeo’s mother says he is lucky to be alive

Source of the article: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46152647?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/topics/cq23pdgvrdwt/prosthetics&link_location=live-reporting-story

3D-printing dad makes bike for children missing limbs

 

Adam Dengel and son ThomasImage copyright ADAM DENGEL                                                                            Adam Dengel was inspired to start helping other children through experiences with his son

A dad who builds 3D-printed arms in his garage workshop has created a specially adapted bicycle for children missing an upper limb.

Adam Dengel, 30, created his first DIY limb in his bedroom for son Thomas, four, who was born without a hand.

He has since set up a charity and made superhero-themed prosthetics free of charge for children around the world.

For his latest project, he plans to surprise four children with their own custom-made bikes.

They cost £220 to make and are fitted with an ergonomic cup which allows the rider to reach the handlebars without leaning.

Mr Dengel said the modification makes the bikes safer to ride than a normal model.

The parts, like the arms, are created on Mr Dengel’s 3D printer in the garage of his home in Royston, Barnsley, which he has converted into a workshop.

“These kids haven’t had the best start in life and we wanted to help boost their confidence,” he said.

“Plus this gets them outside, riding bikes with other youngsters, and helping them to make friends.”

The adapted bikeImage copyright ADAM DENGEL
The design means children with missing upper limbs do not have to lean to reach the handlebars

Mr Dengel, 30 and his wife Katie were inspired to help others through their experiences with their son.

Thomas was born with a short forearm and missing his hand due to amniotic band syndrome – a rare condition where stray bands of tissue wrap around the limbs of an unborn baby and cut off blood flow.

Unhappy with the basic NHS prosthetic, the couple started looking at alternatives and found a charity which made Thomas his first mechanical arm.

This led him to buy his own printer and set about creating a number of colourful, comic book-inspired hands for his son – including his latest Batman-themed prosthetic.

Some of the arms made by Adam DengelImage copyrightADAM DENGEL
Image captionThe bike adaptations and arms are built by 3D printers
Thomas DengelImage copyright ADAM DENGEL
Son Thomas has a selection of superhero arms thanks to his father’s efforts
Presentational white space

Through the couple’s charity LimbBo Foundation, Mr Dengel has so far built 33 personalised arms for children, including youngsters in America and Holland.

“To say we the charity started out as an idea on the sofa we’re thrilled with how things have gone,” he said.

“We only ever wanted to help other kids like Thomas and it gives us so much pleasure to know we’re doing that.”

Source of the article: BBC News