Video of joyful Afghan boy dancing on new prosthetic leg goes viral

Ahmad Rahman had to have his leg amputated after he was shot as a baby in Logar province

Beaming young Afghan amputee dances on new prosthetic leg – video

When Ahmad Rahman was eight months old he and his sister, Salima, were injured when fighting broke out between Afghan government forces and the Taliban in their village in Logar province. Rahman was shot in the leg, which was later amputated.

His story is one of tens of thousands in Afghanistan, of people losing limbs due to war, but a video of him testing out his new prosthetic leg has provided a moment of joy.

The footage – filmed by physiotherapist Mulkara Rahimi at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) orthopaedic clinic in Kabul – has gone viral, showing a smiling young boy dancing after being fitted with his new leg – his fourth because they need to be replaced as he grows up. It gained more than 12,000 views in the first 12 hours.

The video of Rahman was also shared on social media by the ICRC’s Roya Musawi, and has been viewed more than 980,000 times in her tweet alone.

The ICRC’s clinic has registered almost 178,000 patients with disabilities in Afghanistan, including more than 46,100 amputees, since it started logging the injuries in 1988.

More than a million people in Afghanistan suffer some form of disability, many through injuries from four decades of war.

Of the ICRC patients who have lost limbs, almost two-thirds are due to landmines, improvised explosive devices, and other war remnants.

The video has brought global attention to the centre, its director, Alberto Cairo, told the Washington Post.

Source of the Article: TheGuardian.com

3-year-old Gets New Legs, Learns To Walk For First Time

After living most of her life without legs, a 3-year-old Cuban girl took a big first step toward a normal life Monday. Doctors amputated both of Alexa Prieto’s legs when she was just 3-months-old.

Her mother had taken her to the hospital in Havana for intestinal issues, but the infant contracted gangrene and Alexa had to lose her legs to save her life. Because she was so young at the time, Alexa has never walked in her life.

After undergoing surgery last fall to prepare for the prosthetics, Shriners Hospital for Children in Tampa fitted the toddler with a pair of temporary legs, allowing her to stand for the first time. It was a moment her mother Jacqueline Vidal, called “very emotional.”

“Everybody’s waiting for this moment,” Vidal said through the help of a translator. “They’ve been waiting for a long time to see her walk.”

Armando Quirantes, a Cuban-born prosthesis specialist, saw Alexa’s story on television and decided to sponsor the little girl, bringing her to Florida for treatment.

“She brought her little girl to the hospital for a simple intestinal problem, and she returned with a little girl with no legs,” Quirantes said, referring to Vidal.

Dr. Bryan Sinnott, a senior prosthetist at Shriners, explained that Alexa’s temporary prosthetics are clear, allowing them to see and adjust should the toddler encounter any issues while learning how to use them.

“Because she’s a child she’s going to learn very well, very fast,” he said. “I think she’s going to do really good.”

While he called it amazing to see Alexa stand for the first time, Sinnott says watching Vidal in that moment was truly the vision.

“You watch how a mom takes in the fact her child is standing, it’s a wonderful thing,” he said. “I’m just lucky to be a part of all this.”

Contact Teter Orthotics & Prosthetics for any prosthetic or orthotic care questions or needs. We’ve been providing expert prosthetic and orthotic services in Michigan since 1955 and have grown to  22 locations, including Traverse City, Alma, Kalamazoo, Marquette, and Gaylord!

 

Source of the Article: teterop.com

Prosthetic leg for Amputees designed by Jae-Hyun An to encourage new genre of ballet

Source of the Article: Dezeen.com
Prosthetic ballet leg for amputees encourages new genre of dancePratt Institute graduate Jae-Hyun An has created a prosthetic leg that allows amputees to perform ballet like never before. Unlike regular artificial limbs, which are designed to mimic the human body, the Marie-T enables amputee ballet dancers to enhance their performance. Made up of three components, Marie-T features a weighty foam-injected rotational moulded foot, with a stainless-steel toe and rubber grip that help provide the dancer with balance and momentum during rotations.

In mainstream ballet, dancers typically move in and out of the pointe position – when all body weight is supported by the tips of fully extended feet within pointe shoes. However, because of the immense strain on the foot and ankle of a performer, it is impossible for a ballet dancer to constantly perform in this position. Jae-Hyun An, who studied on the Pratt’s Industrial Design programme, designed the carbon-fibre Marie-T to enable amputees to dance on pointe throughout a performance.Jae-Hyun An designs prosthetic leg for ballet called Marie-T

New York-based An said the design, which is named after 19th-century Swedish ballet dancer Marie Taglioni, could encourage amputees to develop a new choreography that has never been achieved by mainstream ballerinas. “I wanted to explore what would happen if you could allow a person to perform on pointe 100 per cent of the time,” said An, who developed Marie-T over the course of four months. “How would ballet change? I wanted to create a tool for someone to take and let their imagination define the capabilities of the product.”

Prosthetic ballet leg for amputees encourages new genre of dance

During research, An realised that a weak ankle can twist and cause a ballerina in pointe position to wobble. In response, An designed a strong and stable ankle area that helps the ballerina stay in balance. The ankle connects to a slightly curved carbon-fibre limb which helps absorb the shock from the impact of the ballet dancer stepping forward. The limb is topped by a 3D-printed socket with steel round head screws. Ill-fitting prosthetic limbs can cause blisters and rashes on dancers, so An designed the Marie-T so that the parts can be easily switched out when they become well worn or need to be resized. The designer told Dezeen: “Prosthetics by itself is such a powerful and inspirational design. Any form of it is really amazing! Whether it is Hugh Herr’s bionic legs from the Biomechatronics Group in MIT, or the Flex-Foot Cheetah Leg from Ossur, or even a peg leg from… whenever.”

“It is inspiring because the technology is incredible but even more so because of the immense struggle an amputee has to overcome to use these products. Some argue that some of these prostheses give amputees a certain advantage in specific tasks, but I am not sure they would say the same if they ever saw how much training and care it takes to handle a prosthesis,” he continued.

“In my research I came across Viktoria Modesta and she re-interpreted performance with her prosthetics. It was visually so powerful and opened a completely new area of prosthetics for me. I fell in love with the idea of designing something that could expand the artistic and cultural scene of a community with prosthetic users.”

Prosthetic ballet leg for amputees encourages new genre of dance

Bath boy campaigns to recycle prosthetic legs

An 11-year-old amputee is championing a charity’s campaign to recycle children’s prosthetic legs.

Euan Murray, from Bath, was born with a birth defect that meant his left leg had to be amputated below the knee when he was 11 months old.

He realised his outgrown legs could benefit others and has donated 10 old prosthetic legs through Legs4Africa.

“I feel proud because I was once wearing these and I’m giving them to people that really need them,” he said.

“The prosthetic leg enables me to do everything I’m passionate for, which is mainly sport.

“If I didn’t have a leg and I was still an amputee, I would be a very different person because I would be stuck in a wheelchair and I would miss out on a lot.”

Euan playing a drum kit at homeCREATED BY TEN
Euan’s mum found out about the charity on social media and he immediately wanted to donate his old legs

Tom Williams, founder of the Bristol-based charity, said Euan was doing “a fantastic thing”.

“I never fail to be full of admiration for the little ones who accept their new leg as part of their life and don’t allow it to define who they are,” he said.

“There is a huge demand for components to build children’s prosthetics in Africa.”

The charity collects and recycles prosthetic limbs sourced from UK hospitals and private donors and then ships them to Africa where they are adapted and fitted by trained technicians at partnering hospitals.

One of Euan’s legs has been given to Wudeh, a seven-year-old girl in The Gambia whose leg was amputated following a car accident.

Euan and his family have seen pictures of Wudeh on Facebook wearing his old leg which he said was “really amazing”.

Euan issued a direct message to Wudeh, saying: “I hope this leg enables you to do everything it helped me to do and it brings you happiness in your life.”

Wudeh with one of Euan's old prosthetic legsCREATED BY TEN
Wudeh now has one of Euan’s old prosthetic legs
source of the Article: BBC.co.uk

Cardiff boy, 7, finally walks after losing both legs aged 3

Romeo was diagnosed with purpura fulminans after complaining of leg pain

Romeo Hadley was three years old when he lost both his legs.

Now seven, after 18 months of hard work, he can walk on prosthetic limbs.

Romeo had complained of leg pains before he was diagnosed with purpura fulminans, a thrombotic condition that causes necrosis and blood coagulation.

“He had to lose his legs to stay alive…. although that sounds devastating and awful we took him home and that was enough for us,” explained his mother Katie Hadley, from Cardiff.

The experience of seeing her son so unwell has stayed with her.

Romeo in hospitalImage copyrightFAMILY HANDOUT
Image captionRomeo spent six months in hospital

“It was horrendous and I will never forget it, and even speaking about it now… we don’t speak about it, we stay very positive for Romeo because he is positive,” she said.

“He’s an amazing little boy who’s very very lucky to be alive. So we don’t go back to that time to be honest.”

Romeo spent six months in hospital before he was able to come home. But adapting to life without his legs was hard.

By October 2017, he was able to stand on his prosthetics but did not enjoy using them at home so Mrs Hadley arranged for him to start taking them into school.

Romeo learned to walk on his prosthetics at school

A year later she received a video of Romeo finally walking without a frame with the assistance of his teacher.

“I was blown away,” she said.

“My husband and I, our whole family, [my daughter] Seren, everyone, was so emotional to see how well he’s done.

“If he can do that now, what can he do in the future?”

The Hadley family
Image caption The Hadley family from left to right: Jonathan, Seren, Romeo and Katie

Romeo loves playing football and dreams of being a professional basketball player.

“My husband and I are here to just make him psychologically strong enough to cope with life in the future,” said Mrs Hadley.

“Romeo loves life, he’s gorgeous, and he’s absolutely the happiness in this house.

“He gets on with life… he enjoys every single moment.”

Romeo’s mother says he is lucky to be alive

Source of the article: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46152647?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/topics/cq23pdgvrdwt/prosthetics&link_location=live-reporting-story

How paralyzed patients are able to stand again (Extracted from CNN.COM)

(CNN) In what’s being hailed as a breakthrough in spinal cord injury research, four men paralyzed from the chest down have risen from their wheelchairs on their own volition and effort.

“I can stand up for more than half an hour,” said Dustin Shillcox, who was paralyzed in a car accident five years ago. “It’s awesome. It’s amazing. It’s a hopeful feeling.”
Shillcox and the other three men had electrical stimulators surgically implanted in their spines, and are working toward walking again someday. Their standing achievements were published Friday in the online journal PLOS ONE by Dr. Susan Harkema and her colleagues at the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center at the University of Louisville.
The Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, which helped fund the study, has named the Kentucky research as its “Big Idea” and is raising $15 million to do the procedure in dozens more patients.
Already, more than 4,000 people have signed up to become research subjects.
“We’re really excited. We think the future looks very bright for those with spinal cord injuries,” said Peter Wilderotter, the president of the foundation.
While the patients work toward walking — and no one knows if they’ll succeed — they have already experienced other benefits of the stimulator. Their increased mobility (they can lift and swing their legs and two can even do sit-ups) has already improved their health. One patient, for example, has seen his wildly fluctuating blood pressure come under control.
All four men say the stimulator has allowed them to have sex again and has given them dramatically increased control over their bowels and bladder.
“Sure, I’d like to walk someday,” said Kent Stephenson, one of the study subjects. “But just give me sexual function and bowel and bladder control — I’m a happy camper.”

Dustin Shillcox stands again.

This isn’t the first time people with paralysis have risen from their wheelchairs. Since the mid-’90s, Dr. Ronald Triolo’s team at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland has implanted stimulators in the legs and hips of more than 30 people, allowing them to stand up. Some have even taken steps.
But according to Triolo, there’s one major difference: The stimulators he uses “hijack” the muscles and tell them what to do. The Kentucky researchers put their stimulators right at the spine, so they affect the central nervous system. The patients themselves then have direct control over their muscles, and make them move on their own.
“The cachet, the unique thing Susie Harkema is doing, is she’s letting the muscles act naturally rather than forcing them to act,” said Triolo, a professor of orthopedics and biomedical engineering at Case Western. “It’s one step closer to more natural function.”
Shillcox, who’s started a foundation to help others affected by paralysis, said he could stand within a month after receiving his stimulator, but he needed people to support his hips, which weren’t steady, and his knees, which sometimes buckled.
Now, after more than two years of practice, he doesn’t need help from anyone getting up or staying up. He does, however, have to put his hand on something for balance.
“I’m working on that so I don’t have to hang on to anything,” he said. “The progress might be coming slowly, but we keep making gains.”

Hi-tech legs help amputee reporter snowboard

The prosthetics experts at Dorset Orthopaedic and Ottobock have been featured in an exciting episode of the BBC’s flagship technology programme, BBC Click.

Available on BBC News Channels and on iPlayer, the programme focuses on the technology behind the upcoming 2018 Winter Paralympics. BBC Click reporter and double below-knee amputee Kathleen Hawkins had the chance to try out the ground-breaking ski and snowboarding prosthesis, the Ottobock ProCarve which helps Paralympic skiers and snowboarders compete at the highest level.

The programme follows Kathleen during a fitting with Dorset Orthopaedic Clinic Prosthetist Kevin Shaw, who explained the unique advantages of the ProCarve for snowboarders. Kathleen was then joined by Ottobock Head of Prosthetics, Emma Gillespie for the ultimate test: using the ProCarves on the slopes. The ProCarve can fit into a snowboarding boot, and has a pneumatic spring and a large, air-filled cylinder at the ankle joint that act as a shock absorber. This increases the rider’s comfort and also contributes to a better body position whilst boarding. The air pressure inside the cylinder can be tailored to suit the individual’s riding style and type of terrain.

Kathleen commented: “Getting to try out the ProCarve feet for BBC Click was such a fun and interesting experience. I’ve snowboarded (badly) in the past and it was great to feel a different sensation on the snow and think about the independence these feet could give to amputees wanting to get on the slopes with confidence. It’s the best aspect of technology for me. Now I just need to save my pennies.”

“I hope that this programme will give people some insight into the work that goes on behind the scenes to help para-athletes at every level to perform at their best, from fitting and alignment to making sure you have a good socket,” said Kevin, who has over 30 years’ experience in prosthetics.

Emma added: “This is a wonderful opportunity to showcase the kind of product that can help someone achieve their dreams, whether that’s to be a Paralympian or just get out on the slopes for a few hours. This is exactly why Ottobock are constantly investing in research and development, to be at the cutting edge of prosthetic technology used for sports and everyday life.”

In addition to creating specialist winter sports prostheses such as the ProCarve, Ottobock is the Official Prosthetic, Orthotic and Wheelchair Technical Service Provider for the PyeongChang 2018 Paralympic Winter Games. These Paralympic Winter Games will be the biggest to date, with 80 medal events in six sports: Para alpine skiing, Para biathlon, Para cross-country skiing, Ice sledge hockey, Para snowboard and Wheelchair curling. With 670 athletes from 42 nations expected to compete, Ottobock technicians will be busy repairing wheelchairs, sit-skis, and any other equipment athlete or members of the Paralympic Family rely on for competition and everyday life.

As featured on the BBC Reporter Kat Hawkins tried out prosthetic feet designed for skiing and snowboarding.

Article source: Pos’ability Magazine (posabilitymagazine.co.uk)